Recipes

Parker House Rolls

1/2 cup room temp water

2 tsp active dry yeast

2 Tbsp sugar

3/4 cup whole or low-fat milk, boiled and cooled to room temp

3 Tbsp unsalted butter at room temp, plus 1 stick (8 Tbsp) unsalted butter melted

2 large eggs, lightly beaten

2 1/2-3 cups bread flour (divided use) plus extra as needed

1 tsp salt

Vegetable oil for greasing

Egg wash (1 large egg whisked with 2 tbsp cold milk or water)

Combine the water, yeast, and sugar in a large bowl. Let sit until frothy, 2-3 minutes. Add the cooled milk, the 3 Tbsp butter, the eggs, 1 1/2 cups of flour, and salt. Stir until the dough begins to form long elastic strands, 5-6 minutes. Gradually add more flour until the dough is too heavy to stir.

Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface and knead for about 10 minutes, adding flour only to prevent the dough from sticking. The dough should be moist, smooth, and springy when it is properly kneaded. Transfer to a lightly oiled bowl, turn to coat, cover with a clean, damp cloth, and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, 1-2 hours. Fold the dough over and let rest for 10 minutes.

Lightly grease two 9 x 11-inch baking pans with oil. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Cut the dough into 24 equal pieces. Cover and let rest until relaxed, 15-20 minutes. Use a rolling pin to roll each piece into a 2×5 inch oval. Press the dull edge of a table knife in the center of each oval lengthwise to make a crease. Brush each roll with a thin coat of melted butter, and fold each in half so that the butter is on the inside. Place the rolls in the prepared pans seam sides up. They should be close, but not touching. Cover the rolls with a damp cloth and let rise until neatly doubled in size. Preheat the oven to 350.

Brush the rolls lightly with egg wash (or butter, butter is better). Bake until golden brown, 15-20 minutes. Let the rolls cool slightly before serving.

Challah 

3 1/2 cups bread flour plus extra as needed

2 tsp active dry yeast

1 cup room temp water

3 large eggs

2 large eggs yolks

1/4 cup vegetable oil plus extra for greasing

1/4 cup sugar

2 1/2 tsp slat

Egg wash (1 large egg whisked with 2 Tbsp cold milk or water)

Combine the flour and yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook. Add the water, eggs and egg yolks, oil sugar and salt and mix on low speed for 4 minutes. Increase the speed to medium and knead for 4 minutes. The dough should be soft but not sticky.

Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl, turn to coat, cover with plastic wrap or a damp towel, and let rise in a warm place until nearly doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Fold the dough gently, cover, and let rest until relaxed, 20 minutes. Divide the dough into 3 equal pieces. Cover and let rest until relaxed, 15-20 minutes. Working with 1 piece at a time, place the dough on a lightly floured work surface and press lightly with your fingertips to stretch into a 6×10-inch rectangle, using only as much flour as needed to keep the dough form sticking. Fold the long top edge of the dough to the center of the rectangle, pressing lightly with your fingertips to tighten the outer surface of the dough. Fold the dough in half lengthwise so the top edge meets the bottom and use the heel of your palm to seal the edges together; keep the seam straight.

Roll each piece of dough into a tapered cylinder 12 inches long, increasing the pressure of your hands as you work outward form the center. Lay the 3 ropes of dough parallel to one another. Begin braiding in the center of the stands. Place the left strand over the center strand, and then the right stand over the center strand. Continue until you have reached one end, and pinch the ends together tightly. Turn the braid around so that the upbraided stands are facing you. Flip the braid over and repeat the braiding until you have again reached the end of the dough. Pinch the ends together tightly, tuck them under, and place the dough on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet.

Brush the dough lightly with egg wash and let rise a second time until it springs back slowly to the touch but does not collapse, 1 hour. Do not cover the dough; the egg was will make it sticky.

Preheat the oven to 350. Very gently brush the dough with egg wash again before baking. (if the first layer of egg wash is dry before you apply a second coat, the challah will be shinier after it is baked.) Bake until the challah is a dark golden brown, shiny, and lightweight, 25-30 minutes. Let cool completely on a wire rack before serving.

Brioches a Tete

5 cups bread flour plus extra as needed

2 1/2 tsp active dry yeast

4 large eggs, plus 1 beaten egg for brushing

1/2 cup whole milk

1/4 cup sugar

2 tsp salt

1 1/2 cups (3 sticks) unsalted butter, diced, at room temperature

Cooking spray for greasing

Combine the flour and yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook. Add the eggs, milk, sugar, and salt and mix on a low speed until evenly blended, scraping down the bowl with a rubber spatula as needed, about 4 minutes.

Gradually add the butter with the mixer running on low speed, scraping down the bowl with a rubber spatula as needed, 2 minutes. After the butter has been fully incorporated, increase the speed to medium and knead until the dough begins to pull away from the sides of the bowl and is quite elastic, about 15 minutes.

Remove the dough form the bowl, shape into a brick, wrap will in plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 8 hours.

Coat individual brioche tins or muffin pans with cooking spray.

Cover the shaped brioches with a clean, damp cloth and let rise until they are neatly doubled in size, 1 1/2-2 hours. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 375.

Brush the brioches with beaten egg once more before putting then in the oven. Bake until they are a rich golden brown, about 15 minutes. Let cool in the tins or muffin pans for 10 minutes, then unmold and finish cooling on a wire rack before serving.

Super Crunchy Potatoes

  • 6-8 large floury potatoes (Coliban in particular or Sebago are great for roasting here in Oz), peeled and cut into halves and or quarters if the potatoes are very large.
  • Sea salt
  • A few sprigs fresh rosemary
  • Canola oil
  1. Pre-heat oven to 200˚C/392 ˚F
  2. Add 1/3 cup canola oil to a large baking tray, place in the pre-heated oven to heat the oil.
  3. Half-fill a large pot with cold water, add a generous pinch of salt, add the potatoes and bring to the boil over high heat. Par boil until slightly softened, you want the potatoes to be just cooked through when tested with a knife, but not so much that they will be overly boiled and fall apart totally when drained.
  4. Drain potatoes then return them to the pot, cover with the lid then give the pot a really good shake to roughen up the edges of the potatoes and encourage them to become really fluffy. If you like use a fork to fluff up the tops of the potatoes even further by scraping any lose potato on top into little mounds on top.
  5. Using a pair of tongs carefully add the par-cooked potatoes into the hot oil and season tops with a sprinkling of sea salt. Scatter some rosemary leaves around the tray then roast potatoes for 1-1¼ hours or until they are super crunchy and crisp.

Sourdough Bread

Starter

4 cups bread flour (divided use) plus extra as needed

4 cups room temp water plus extra as needed

½ cup grated raw organic potato

1 ½ cups room temp water

½ tsp active dry yeast

3 ½ cups bread flour plus extra as needed

1 tsp salt

Vegetable oil for greasing

To make the starter, combine 1 cup of flour, 1 cup of the water, and the potato in a plastic or glass bowl; the sides of the bowl should be high enough to permit the mixture to triple in volume. Cover the container and set aside at room temperature. After 24 hours, feed the sourdough starter with 1 cup flour and 1 cup water every 12 hours for a total of at least 3 feedings. Continued feedings will give the sourdough a more pronounced flavor. (To store unused starter, refrigerate and feed once a day.)

To make the bread, combine 1 cup of the sourdough starter, the water, and the yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook and blend with a fork until the yeast is fully dissolved. Add the flour and salt and mix with the dough hook on low speed just to incorporate. Increase the speed to medium and knead until the dough is smooth and elastic, 10-12 minutes. Add more flour as necessary while kneading if the dough seems sticky.

Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl, turn to coat, cover with plastic wrap or a damp towel, and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 75 minutes. Fold the dough over on itself, pressing gently to release the gas. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface.

Cut the dough into 2 equal pieces and round each piece into a smooth ball, pinching the seams together at the bottom of the ball. Place each round, seam side up, in a bowl or round basket lined with a floured float-weave towel. Let the dough rise until it has increased in volume by three-quarters, 20-30 minutes. Let cool on wire racks before slicing and serving.

Focaccia

Sponge

1 ½ cups room- temp water

2 ¼ tsp active dry yeast

1 cup bread flour

2 ¼ cups bread flour plus extra for dusting

4 tsp extra-virgin olive oil plus extra as needed

2 tsp table salt

Coarse salt or salt flakes for garnishing

To make the sponge, combine the water and yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook or in a large mixing bowl. Stir until the yeast is dissolved. Stir in the flour to make a soft batter about the consistency of pancake batter. Mix by hand until very smooth. Cover the bowl and let rise in a warm place until the sponge is thick and foamy and nearly doubled in size, about 3 hours.

To make the final dough, add the bread flour, 4 tsp olive oil, and table salt. Mix and knead the dough with the dough hook on medium speed until smooth and elastic, about 10 minutes.

Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl, turn to coat, cover with plastic wrap or a damp towel, and let rise in a warm place until nearly doubled in size, about 40 minutes.

Fold the dough over on itself by lifting the edges up and over the center. Cover and allow to relax for another 15 minutes. Preheat the oven to 400. Coat a baking sheet liberally with olive oil.

Turn the dough out onto a well-floured work surface and, using your palms; gently stretch the dough into a rectangle that is an even 1 inch thick and nearly the same dimensions as your baking sheet. Avoid tearing or puncturing the dough with your fingertips. Transfer to the baking sheet, cover, and let rise until the dough springs back slowly to the touch but does not collapse, about 40 minutes.

Use your fingertips to gently dimple the surface of the focaccia and drizzle with additional olive oil. Scatter with the coarse salt or other toppings if desired. Bake until the focaccia has a golden brown crust and sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom, 25-30 minutes. Let cool completely on wire racks.

Poached Pears with Chocolate Sauce

 4 cups water
1 1/3 cup sugar
4 Bosc pears, peeled
1 cinnamon stick
2 teaspoons whole cloves
1 vanilla bean,  split
2-3 star anise
1/2 cup dried cranberries or raisins (optional)

Simple Chocolate Sauce –
1/2 cup Ghirardelli 60% cacao chips (or any good-quality bittersweet chocolate)
2 to 3 tablespoons cream (whole milk will work, too)

Directions:
In a large pot, heat the water and sugar until the sugar is dissolved. Add the remaining ingredients (except cranberries or raisins). Cover with parchment paper with a small hole cut in the center and place a lid on the pot.  Simmer and cook the pears 15 to 25 minutes, depending on the pears and how ripe they are.  You want the pears soft but not falling apart.  Remove from heat and let the pears cool in the liquid.  While the poaching liquid is still warm, add the cranberries or raisins

For the chocolate sauce, place chocolate chips in a microwavable bowl and add the cream or milk.  Microwave on high for 30 seconds.  Remove and stir to combine cream with chocolate.  If necessary, return to microwave and cook for another 30 seconds.  Add more cream if sauce is too thick.  Drizzle over the tops of the pears.

Ciabatta

Baking with the Culinary Institute of America 

 Ingredients:

For the Biga

1 1/2 cups bread flour

1/2 cup room temperature water (68º-76º F)

1/4 teaspoon active dry yeast

For the Final Dough

3 1/2 cups bread flour plus more for dusting

1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast

1 1/2 cups room temperature water (68º-76º F)

2 teaspoons salt

Directions:

For the Biga

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook, combine the flour, water and yeast.  Mix on low speed until thoroughly combined, about 3 minutes.  Transfer the mixture to a large bowl, cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise in a warm place until bubbly, airy, and just starting to recede, about 8-10 hours.

For the Final Dough

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook, combine the flour and yeast.  Add the water, biga, and salt and mix on low speed for 3 minutes.  Increase the speed to medium and knead until the dough is blended, about 3 minutes more.  The dough should be wet and slack.

Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl, turning to coat, cover with plastic wrap and let rise until nearly doubled in size, about 30 minutes.  After 30 minutes, press the dough with a fingertip; the indentation should not fill in rapidly.  Fold the dough over on itself by lifting the edges up and over the center and pressing gently to release the gas.  Allow the dough to rest for another 15 minutes.

Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface and dust the top with additional flour.  Using your palms, gently press the dough into an 8×9-inch rectangle that is an even 1-inch thick.  Cut the dough into two 8×4 1/2-inch rectangles.  Cover the dough with a kitchen towel and let rest again for 15-20 minutes.  Gently free the dough from the surface, trying not to tear or stretch the dough.  Transfer the dough to a large parchment lined baking sheet.  Gently stretch each piece into a 10×4 1/2-inch rectangle.  Cover and let the dough rise in a warm, draft free space for 30-45 minutes.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 425º F.  Bake the ciabatta until golden brown and the crust sounds hollow when thumped on the bottom, about 25-30 minutes.  Transfer to wire racks to cool completely.  Enjoy!

Sugar Spice Almonds

3/4 Sugar

3/4 Brown Sugar

2 Tablespoon Cinnamon

1 ½  teaspoon All-Spice

1 ½  teaspoon Nutmeg

1/8 teaspoon kosher salt

1 egg white

2 teaspoon Vanilla

3 cups Almonds

¼ cup water

  1. Mix sugars, Cinnamon, All-spice, Nutmeg and salt in a bowl.
  2. In a separate bowl whisk egg white and vanilla together until frothy. Add almonds and stir till thoroughly coated. This will help the sugars to stick to the almonds.
  3. Get your slow cooker ready by spraying it with cooking spray. Add almonds and sugar-spice mix into the slow cooker. This will cook for 3 hours total. Turn on high for first 20 minutes then turn it on low for remaining time. Stir every 20 minutes.
  4. In the last hour add the water and stir well. This will make a crunchy coating.
  5. Put parchment paper on baking sheet and spread the almonds onto the sheet to cool. Let them cool. Devour.

Pumpkin Pie

Ingredients:

1 sugar pumpkin

1 recipe pastry for a 9 inch single crust pie

2 eggs

1 cup packed light brown sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 1/2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice

1 (12 fluid ounce) can evaporated milk

Directions:

1.Cut pumpkin in half and remove seeds. Place cut side down on a cookie sheet lined with lightly oiled aluminum foil. Bake at 325 degrees F (165 degrees C) for 30 to 40 minutes, or until the flesh is tender when poked with a fork. Cool until just warm. Scrape the pumpkin flesh from the peel. Either mash, or puree in small batches in a blender. Increase oven temperature to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C.)

2.In a large bowl, slightly beat eggs. Add brown sugar, flour, salt, 2 cups of the pumpkin puree, pumpkin pie spice, and evaporated milk. Stir well after each addition.

3. Pour mixture into the unbaked pastry shell. Place a strip of aluminum foil around the edge of the crust to prevent over browning.

4.Bake 10 minutes at 450 degrees F (230 degrees C), then reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Bake an additional 40 to 50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Remove the strip of foil about 20 minutes before the pie is done so that the edge of the crust will be a light golden brown. Cool pie, and refrigerate overnight for best flavor.

Pork Ribs

Ingredients:

  • 1  tablespoon  chili powder
  • 1  tablespoon  ground coffee
  • 1  teaspoon  ground cumin
  • 4  tablespoons  brown sugar
  • 3/4  teaspoon  cayenne pepper
  • kosher salt and black pepper
  • 6  pounds  spareribs (2racks)
  • 3/4  cup  ketchup
  • 1/3  cup  apple cider vinager
  • 1/4  cup  molasses
  • 2  tablespoons  tomato paste

Directions:

  1. Heat oven to 275° F. Make the rub: In a small bowl, combine the chili powder, coffee, cumin, 2 tablespoons of the brown sugar, ½ teaspoon of the cayenne, 2 teaspoons salt, and 1 teaspoon black pepper.
  2. Place the ribs on a large rimmed baking sheet. Rub the ribs with the spice mixture and tightly cover the baking sheet with foil. Bake until tender and the meat easily pulls away from the bone, 2½ to 3 hours.
  3. Meanwhile, make the sauce: In a saucepan, combine the ketchup, vinegar, molasses, tomato paste, the remaining 2 tablespoons of sugar and ¼ teaspoon of cayenne, and ½ teaspoon black pepper. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until slightly thickened, 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer ½ cup of the sauce into a small bowl for serving.
  4. Heat grill to medium-high. Grill the ribs, basting with the remaining sauce and turning occasionally, until just beginning to char, 4 to 5 minutes. Serve with the reserved sauce.

Baguettes

 Baking at Home with The Culinary Institute of America.
Ingredients: 
1 3/4 cups room temperature water (68F to 76F)
1 teaspoon active dry yeast
4 1/2 cups bread flour
2 teaspoons salt
— Cornmeal for dusting
Directions:
  1. Combine water and yeast in a bowl and stir until yeast is completely dissolved. Add flour and salt and mix with a dough hook on low speed to incorporate ingredients. Increase speed to medium and knead until dough is smooth and elastic, 10 to 12 minutes.
  2. Transfer dough to a lightly oiled bowl, turn to coat, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise until nearly doubled in size, about 30 minutes.
  3. Scrape dough onto a wooden board. Fold over dough gently. Return to bowl. Let rise 45 minutes.
  4. Transfer dough to a lightly floured work surface. Fold dough over again, pressing gently to release gas. Cut into 2 equal pieces.
  5. Round each piece into a smooth ball, pinching seams together at the bottom. Cover dough and let rest, seam side down, 30 minutes.
  6. Sprinkle baking sheet with cornmeal. To shape baguettes, press each ball of dough into a rectangle on a lightly floured work surface. Holding the short edges of the rectangle, lift and stretch the dough until it is about 8 inches long. Fold one long edge of dough toward the center, pressing seam with fingertips. Fold again, in half lengthwise, using the heel of your hand to seal the edges. Roll dough under your palms into a cylinder about 18 inches long. Move your hands outward from the center of the cylinder and slightly increase the pressure as you move outward, until both ends have an even gentle taper.
  7. Transfer dough, seam side down to the baking sheet. Cover loaves and let rise until increased in volume by three-quarters, about 1 hour.
  8. Preheat oven to 425F. Score each loaf 5 to 7 times by making diagonal slashes through the outer layer of dough with a thin blade. Just before baking, brush or mist each baguette lightly with water.
  9. Bake about 30 minutes. During the first 5 minutes of baking, brush or mist bread 1 or 2 more times with water. Loaves are done when golden and sound hollow when tapped on the bottom. Remove loaves from oven and let cool on wire racks. Makes 2 loaves.

Raisin Bread with a Cinnamon Swirl 

Baking at home with The Culinary Institute of  America

Ingredients:

4 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (plus more for sprinkling)

2 teaspoons active dry yeast

2 cups milk, boiled and cooled to room temperature

8 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature

1/4 cup brown sugar

2 egg

2 teaspoon salt

1 cup dark raisins

1 tablespoon cinnamon

vegetable oil (for greasing the bowl and pan)

egg wash (mix 1 egg + 1 tablespoon milk)

cinnamon sugar (1/2 tablespoon cinnamon + 1/3 cup brown sugar)

Directions:

  1. Combine the flour and yeast. Add the milk, butter, sugar, eggs, and salt. Mix on low speed for 4 minutes and on medium speed for 4 minutes; in the last minute of mixing, add the raisins, and in the last 30 seconds of mixing, add the cinnamon, mixing just long enough to create a swirl. The dough should be slightly soft.
  2. Bulk ferment the dough until nearly doubled, about 1 hour. Fold gently.
  3. Scale the dough into 1 lb 4-oz/567-g pieces and preshape into an oblong. Let the dough rest, covered, until relaxed, 15 to 20 minutes. Lightly grease six 2-lb/907-g loaf pans.
  4. Roll the dough into an even rectangle 8 in/20 cm wide by 12 in/30 cm long. Brush the dough lightly with egg wash. Combine the brown sugar and cinnamon and sprinkle 1 oz/28 g evenly over the surface. Roll the dough up along the long side under your palms into a cylinder, keeping the pressure even and holding your hands flat and parallel to the work surface to create a smooth, even loaf.
  5. Place the dough seam side down in a greased loaf pan. The dough will spring back on itself slightly and fit snugly in the pan. Brush the loaf lightly with egg wash. Proof, covered, until the dough fills the pan and springs back slowly to the touch but does not collapse, 1 1/2 to 2 hours.
  6. Gently brush the bread again with egg wash. Bake in a 375°F/191°C oven until the crust is brown and the sides spring back when pressed, 25 to 30 minutes. Remove the bread from the pan and cool completely on a rack.

Earl Gray Shortbread Cookies

http://www.theculinarychase.com/2010/10/earl-grey-shortbread.html

Beer Bread 

Baking at Home with The Culinary Institute Of America

Ingredients:

3 2/3 cups bread flour plus extra as needed

½ cup medium rye flour

½ tsp active dry yeast

1 ½ cups dark beer, at room temperature

½ cup small-curd cottage cheese

2 tsp salt

Vegetable oil for greasing

Cornmeal for dusting

Directions:

Combine the bread and rye flours and yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook. Add the beer, cottage cheese, and salt and mix on a low speed for 3 minutes. Increase the speed to medium and knead for 4-5 minutes. The dough should be stick by very strong and stretchy.

Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl, turn to coat, cover with plastic wrap or a damp towel, and let rise in a warm place until nearly doubled in size, about 45 minutes. Fold the dough over on itself, pressing gently to release the gas.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and divide into 2 equal pieces. Round the pieces into smooth balls, pulling the outer layer taut and pinching together the excess dough at the base of the ball. Leave the dough seam sides down on the floured work surface, cover and let rest for15 minutes.

Prepare 2 baking sheets by scattering them with cornmeal.

To shape the dough into batardes, place each dough round on the work surface with the seam facing up and press lightly along its length with your fingertips to release any air. Press into an 8×10 inch rectangle. Fold a long edge of the dough to the center of the rectangle, pressing lightly with your fingertips to tighten the outer layer of the dough. Fold the dough in half lengthwise and use the heel of your hand to seal the 2 edges together; keep the seam straight. Toll the dough into a tapered shape, like an elongated football, by rolling the by cylinder outward form the center, increasing the pressure slightly as you roll toward the ends, until both ends of the loaf have an even, gentle taper. Increase the pressure at the ends of the loaf to seal the ends.

Transfer the shaped loaves to the prepared baking sheets, seam sides down, cover, and let rise again until nearly doubled in size, about 45 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 425 F.

Make a shallow, straight cut down the center of each loaf and mist evenly with water. Bake the batardes until they are golden brown and sound hallow when thumped on the bottom, 25-30 minutes. Let cool completely on a wire rack before slicing and serving.

Roasted Potato Bread

Baking at Home with The Culinary Institute Of America

Ingredients

Biga

2 cups bread flour

1 ½ cups whole wheat flour

1 ½ cups room temperature water

¼ tsp active dry yeast

Soaker

1 cup cracked wheat

½ cup room temperature water

Roasted Potatoes

2 Yukon Gold potatoes, thinly sliced

2 Tbsp olive oil

1 tsp kosher salt

¼ tsp freshly ground pepper

2 cups bread flour, plus extra as needed

½ cup whole wheat flour

½ cup medium rye flour, plus extra as needed

½ tsp active dry yeast

½ cup room temperature water

2 tsp salt

extra-virgin olive oil for greasing

cornmeal for dusting

Directions: 

To prepare biga, in a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook, mix the flours, water, and yeast on low speed until combined, three minutes. Transfer to a bowl, cover, and let rise in a warm place until it has risen and begun to recede but it is still bubbly and airy, eight-ten hours.

To prepare the soaker, combine the cracked wheat and water in a bowl, cover, and soak in the refrigerator for eight-ten hours.

Preheat the oven to 400 F. Toss the potatoes with olive oil to coat. Season with salt and pepper, spread on a baking sheet, and roast until soft in the center, 25 minutes. Let cool to room temperature.

To prepare the final dough, combine the flours and yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer with the dough hook. Add the water, biga, soaker, and salt. Mix on low speed for four minutes. Add all but one of the roasted potato slices and knead on medium speed until the dough is slightly stiff and potatoes are evenly distributed, 3 minutes.

Transfer dough to lightly oiled bowl, turn to coat, cover with plastic wrap or a damp towel, and let rise until nearly doubled in size, 30 minutes. Fold the dough gently. Let rise for another 30 minutes, then fold again. Cover and let rest 15-20 minutes.

Turn the dough out onto a work surface dusted with rye dough and stretch into 8X10 inch rectangle. Fold the dough in half length-wise and seal the seam by pressing firmly with the heel of your palm, keeping the seam straight.  Using your palms, roll the dough into an even 12 inch cylinder. Dust a small rolling pin and use it to make a cavity length wise in the dough 3 inches wide and deep enough so that the dough on the bottom of the cavity is 1 inch thick. Roll the two thicker edges toward each other until they meet in the middle. Place the dough with the seam side down in a couronne basket, forming a horseshoe shape. Let rise in a warm place, covered, until the dough springs back slowly to the touch but does not collapse, 45-60 minutes

Flip the dough seam-side up onto a cornmeal dusted baking sheet. Score the dough and place the reserved potato slice at the top center of the horseshoe. Brush the dough and potato slice lightly with olive oil. Bake the loaf on the baking sheet until it has a golden brown crust and sounds hollow when thumped on the bottom. 45-50 minutes. Let cool completely on a wire rack before serving.

Rustic Olive Bread 

Baking at Home with The Culinary Institute of America

Ingredients:

1/2  cup pitted dry-cured olives, chopped

cool water as needed

1 2/3 cups bread flour plus extra as needed

½  teaspoon sugar

1 ½  teaspoons active dry yeast

3/4 cup room-temperature water (68-76°F)

1/4 teaspoon salt

vegetable oil for greasing

Directions: 

Soak the olives in cool water to cover for at least 20 minutes and up to 1 hour to remove the excess salt. Drain and blot dry before adding them to the dough.

In a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook, combine the flour and the sugar. Add the yeast, water, and salt and mix on low speed until the dough becomes smooth, elastic, and very springy, 8 – 10 minutes.

Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl, turn to coat, cover with plastic wrap or damp towel, and let rise in a warm place until nearly doubled in size, about 30 minutes. Add the olives to the bowl. Fold the dough over on itself, pressing gently to release the gas, and repeat the folding until the olives are evenly distributed. Cover the dough and let rest until relaxed, about 30 minutes.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and round it into a smooth ball, pulling the outer layer taut and pinching the excess dough together at the base of the ball. Leave the dough seam side down on the floured work surface, cover it with a cloth, and let rest for 15 minutes.

To finish shaping the dough, turn it seam side up and stretch it into a square. Fold the square in half from top to bottom, pressing lightly with your fingertips to tighten the outer layer of the dough. Fold the dough in half again, this time from side to side, and seal the 2 edges together. Round the dough, forming a taut outer surface, and place seam side up in a bowl or round basket lined with a floured, clean flat-weave cloth. Cover loosely.

Let the dough rise until it has nearly doubled in size and the dough springs back slowly to the touch but does not collapse, 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 425°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Turn the dough out seam side down onto the prepared baking sheet. Brush or mist the bread lightly with water. Cut a shallow X into the top of the loaf. Bake until the crust is crisp and well browned and the loaf sounds hollow when thumped on the bottom, 25 – 30 minutes. Let cool completely on a wire rack before slicing and serving.

Thyme and Sun-Dried Tomato Bread 

Baking at Home with The Culinary Institute of America 

(variation of rosemary bread)

Replace the rosemary with 3 Tbsp fresh thyme leaves. Add 1/3 cup minced sun-dried tomatoes with the thyme. Increase the water by 2 Tbsp. Proceed with Rosemary Bread recipe.

Rosemary Bread

Baking at Home with The Culinary Institute of  America 

Ingredients: 

4 cups bread flour plus extra as needed

1 ½ tsp active dry yeast

1 ½ cups room-temperature water

2 Tbsp coarsely chopped fresh rosemary

2 tsp salt

Extra-virgin olive oil for greasing

Cornmeal for dusting

Coarse sea salt for sprinkling

Directions: 

Combine the flour and yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook. Add the water, rosemary and salt and mix on low speed for 3 minutes. Increase the speed to medium and knead for 4 minutes. The dough should be slightly stiff, smooth, and elastic.

Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled blow, turn to coat, cover with plastic wrap or a damp towel, and let rise in a warm place until nearly doubled in size, about 40 minutes. Fold the dough over on itself, pressing gently to release the gas. Let the dough rise a second time, about 40 minutes more.

Divide the dough into 2 equal pieces and round into smooth balls, pulling the outer layers taut and pinching the excess dough together at the base of the balls. Place seam sides down on a lightly floured work surface, cover, and let rest until relaxed, 15-20 minutes.

Prepare 2 baking sheets by scattering them with cornmeal. Put your hands under each dough round and stretch and pull it gently into a rough 6×8 –inch rectangle. It is important to maintain an even thickness. Transfer to baking sheets.

Brush or mist the surface of the dough lightly with water. Let the dough rise for a third time in a warm place, covered until the dough springs back slowly to the touch but does not collapse, 30-40 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 425 F. Score the dough 5 times, starting at the same corner each time and tracing a line to each of the other 3 corners with 3 of the 5 scores. The remaining 2 scores will be in will be in between the first 3, radiating out from the same corner. Brush or mist the dough with water once more. Bake until the loaves have a golden brown crust and sound hollow when thumped upon the bottom, 25-30 minutes. Let cool completely on wire racks. Brush with olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt if desired.

Double Chocolate Cake 

Betty Crocker’s Cookbook

Ingredients:

1 2/3 cups all-purpose flour (do not use self-rising flour)

1 cup packed brown sugar or granulated sugar

¼ cup cocoa

1 teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon salt

1 cup water

1/3 cup vegetable oil

1 teaspoon vinegar

½ teaspoon vanilla

½ cup semisweet chocolate chips

Directions:

Heat oven to 350 F. Mix flour, brown sugar, cocoa, baking soda and salt with fork in ungreased square pan, 8x8x2 inches. Mix in remaining ingredients except chocolate chips. Sprinkle chocolate chips over batter.

Bake until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, 35 to 40 minutes. Sprinkle with powdered sugar if desired. 9 servings.

White Wheat Bread

Baking At Home with the Culinary Institute of America

Ingredients:

5 cups of bread flour plus extra as needed

2 ½ tsp active dry yeast

2 cups room-temperature water (68-76 F)

21/2 tsp salt

Vegetable oil for greasing

Cornmeal for dusting

Directions:

Combine the flour and yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook. Add the water and salt and mix on low speed for 2 minutes. Increase the speed to medium and knead until the dough is smooth and elastic, about 3 minutes more.

Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl, turn to coat, cover with plastic wrap or a damp towel, and let rise in a warm place until nearly doubled in size, about 30 minutes, and fold over again. Divide the dough into 2 equal pieces. Round each piece of dough into a smooth ball. Place the dough seam sides down on a lightly floured work surface. Cover the dough and let rest until relaxed, 15-20 minutes.

Prepare 2 baking sheets by scattering them with cornmeal. (I use parchment paper under the cornmeal. It has potential of sticking if you don’t)

To shape the dough into batardes, place each dough round on a work surface with the seam facing up and press lightly with your fingertips to release any air. Stretch each piece into a 10×14-inch rectangle. Fold the dough in half lengthwise and use the heel of your hand to seal the 2 edges together; keep the seam straight. With the palms of your hands, roll the dough back and forth in a tapered slightly increasing the pressure as you roll toward the ends to gently taper them. Increase the pressure at the ends to seal them.

Transfer the loaves to the prepared baking sheets seam sides down. Let the dough rise in a warm place, covered, until it springs back slowly to the touch but does not collapse, 45 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 425 F.

With a thin, sharp blade score each batarde straight down the center of the loaf. Mist or brush each loaf with water. Bake the batardes until they have a golden brown crust and sound hallow when thumped on the bottom, 20-25 minutes. For a very crisp crust, mist the loaves 1 or 2 more times during the first 5 minutes of baking time. Let cool completely on wire racks before slicing and serving.

Honey-Wheat Sandwich Loaves

Baking At Home with the Culinary Institute of America

Ingredients:
4 Cups Bread Flour plus extra as needed
1 Cup Whole Wheat Flour
2-1/2 tsp Active Dry Yeast
2 Cups Whole or Low Fat Milk, Boiled and Cooled at Room Temperature
1/3 Cup Vegetable Oil plus extra for greasing
1/3 Cup Honey
2 tsp Salt
Cooking Spray for greasing
Egg Wash (1 large egg whisked with 2 tbsp cold milk or water) or milk for brushing
Directions
1. Combine the flours and yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook. Add the milk, oil, honey and salt and mix on low speed until the dough forms a shaggy but even moistened dough, about 2 minutes. Increase the speed to medium and knead until the dough feels satiny and elastic, about 5 minutes.
2. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl, turn to coat, cover with plastic wrap or a damp towel, and let rise in a warm place until nearly doubled in size, about 1 hour.

3. Fold the dough over on itself, pressing gently to release the gas. Turn it out onto a floured work surface and cut into 2 equal pieces. Round each piece into a smooth ball, pulling the outer layer taut and pinching together the excess dough at the base of the ball. Place the dough seam sides down on a lightly floured work surface. Cover the dough and let rest until relaxed, about 20 minutes.

4. Coat two 9 inch loaf pans lightly with cooking spray. Stretch each dough ball into an 8×12 inch rectangle. Fold each short end of the rectangle toward the center of the dough to keep the sides straight and the corners square. Fold a long edge into the corner and use the heel of your hand to seal the edge to the dough. Fold the dough in half length wise and use your fingertips to seal the 2 edges together; keep the seam straight.  The dough should be about 10 inches long. Roll the dough into an even cylinder 12 inches long. Push the ends of the cylinder toward the center until it is 10 inches long and place seam side down into the loaf pans. Brush with egg or milk wash.

5. Let the dough to rise in a warm place, uncovered, until the pans are three quarters full and the dough springs back slowly to the touch, 1 hour. I placed my pans outside. Meanwhile preheat you oven to 400º degrees.

6. Bake until the loaves have a rich golden brown crust and the sides of the bread retain their structure when pressed, 40-50 minutes. Remove the bread from the pans immediately and let cool completely on wire racks before slicing and serving.

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